The invisible mom... are you to blame for her isolation?

I just read an article on the Huffington Post called, The Invisible Mom, about a mother with a 10-year old son with Down Syndrome. This article is not about her son, or his disability, it is about the way adults treat her, and ultimately her son.  It broke my heart and opened my eyes to something I have been guilty of at times. Sadly, I did not realize just how painful my actions, or really lack there of could have been...

I was so moved that I want to share it with you in hopes that you too will learn about the isolation that a parent of a child with special needs endures, and more importantly, hopefully join me in being the change these parents and their children deserve-kindness and consideration.

To read Sue Robin's very real and touching article please click HERE.



April is an award-winning writer, blogger and proud debut novelist - The Devlyn Disguise. Her work has been published in over ten countries and four languages. From books to newspapers, to print/online magazines and everything in between, you can find her work. For more about April, Visit AprilMcCormick.com

5 comments:

Christy Garrett said...

It is sad how people treat others, especially, those with disabilities or handicaps. We are all made the way we are for a reason and people should accept everyone the way they are.

foodpixie said...

Having worked with special needs children, I can say that their peers don't include them, sometimes their interests aren't the same, and children don't know what to think or how to behave towards someone with special needs. It is the responsibility of parents of typical children to teach them to be understanding, kind, compassionate, and friendly, and not discriminate, or else they may take a cue from someone else who is hurtful and disrespectful.

Kristen Mae at Abandoning Pretense said...

When my son was in preschool, they had a policy that if you wanted to pass out invitations at school, the whole class had to be invited. I liked that policy and we still invite the whole class now that my son is seven. They don't always come... he has ADHD and is perceived by some as being "annoying." (I've volunteered in his class and have witnessed the frequent eye-rolling.) I know he doesn't get invited to every party, either. But we'll keep inviting everyone. I'll be damned if we make someone else feel ostracized the way we have sometimes felt.

Jessika Kazaros said...

Oh wow. I read this and can relate- I've been on that side (even without disabilities) as well as nearly been the contributor (nothing to do with a good reason other than a "DUH" moment). But it's sad and ridiculous and something that we all need to confront our insecurities or not knowing how to cope with things we do not understand. Thank you for sharing this.

Suburban Momma said...

I think everyone should read it. I have 2 cousins with disabilities and grew up with them knowing that they were different but loving them just the same and because of that I have always had a special place in my heart for all children with disabilities and I am doing my best to pass that on to The Princess. I always try to include all, but I have seen these types of situations and it's heartbreaking. Thanks for sharing.

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