7/1/18

Health Risks Associated with CDC-Recommended Vaccinations


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend a series of vaccinations for children beginning at birth and continuing through adulthood. Over an average lifetime, an individual following the CDC’s recommended vaccination schedules will receive well over 100 vaccine injections, including immunizations for at least 16 different preventable diseases.
The benefits of vaccination are undeniable; and, according to the CDC, the risks of vaccination are far outweighed by the risks of being infected with a disease such as influenza, measles or tetanus. However, some people who receive immunizations will experience debilitating and potentially-fatal medical conditions. The risks of shoulder injury related to vaccine administration (SIRVA), Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and other injuries and illnesses are well-documented, both in the medical literature and in the case history under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP).
What are Some of the Most-Common Injuries and Illnesses Linked to Vaccines?
While each of the CDC-recommended vaccines has its own risk profile, there are a number of injuries and illnesses that are common among multiple different types of vaccinations. Some of the most-common injuries and illnesses linked to vaccinations in the United States include:
  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM)Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a neurological disorder that causes the immune system to attack the myelin in the brain and spinal cord. It has been linked to vaccinations including the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR). Long-term effects include loss of vision, loss of coordination, muscle weakness and paralysis.
  • AnaphylaxisAnaphylaxis is a severe allergic response that can be triggered by egg proteins and certain other vaccine ingredients. In severe cases, anaphylaxis must be treated as a medical emergency, as patients can experience severe throat swelling resulting in disruption of respiratory function.
  • Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and its Variants – Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and its variants, including Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP), are potentially-serious autoimmune disorders that have been linked to the flu shot and tetanus vaccinations. Symptoms vary in nature and severity, but many patients diagnosed with GBS or CIDP will experience severe long-term complications.
  • Shoulder Injuries Related to Vaccine Administration (SIRVA) – Shoulder injuries related to vaccine administration (SIRVA) result from errors during vaccine injection. This includes errors such as injection the needle too deep into the arm or too high on the shoulder, or using a wrong-size needle. Some of the most-common forms of SIRVA include adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder), brachial neuritis, bursitis, rotator cuff tears and tendonitis.
  • Transverse Myelitis – Transverse myelitis is an inflammatory condition affecting the myelin in the spinal cord. It can cause sensory problems, weakness or paralysis, and bladder and bowel dysfunction, and it has been linked to the vaccines for hepatitis B, MMR, diphtheria and tetanus.
Many individuals diagnosed with these and other types of vaccine-related injuries and illnesses will be entitled to financial compensation under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. Since its establishment in 1988, the VICP has paid more than $3 billion to successful claimants, including compensation for medical expenses, lost earnings, and pain and suffering. Anyone with concerns about a potential vaccine injury or illness should seek medical attention promptly, and should discuss their rights with a lawyer who handles VICP claims as soon as possible.




Two confused parents=One amused baby Hopelessly we are trying raise a baby who is clearly smarter than both of us. April is an award-winning writer, blogger and proud debut novelist - The Devlyn Disguise. Her work has been published in over ten countries and four languages. From books to newspapers, to print/online magazines and everything in between, you can find her work. For more about April, Visit AprilMcCormick.com

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